Salmon egg raising begins at Volney


Volney Elementary second-graders are helping to bring back Atlantic salmon to the region by raising salmon eggs at school.
 
With the help of their teachers, the young students have been tasked with a daily recording of water temperature, temperature units (the water temperature minus 32 degrees), and the number of alive eggs. The eggs, which arrived Jan. 9 from Jack Gramlich of the Onondaga-Cortland-Madison BOCES life-cycle educational program, are housed in a small tank inside a small refrigerator in the second-grade classrooms.
 
During a recent visit from Gramlich, students learned more about the important process, such as the salmon remain in their sac even when their and tail begin to develop. Once all of the energy within the sac is used and the sac goes away, it is then called a fry. As they continue through their life cycle, the salmon develop colors to blend into their environment. Once they start to swim up and look for food, they are ready to be released into a stream.
 
The second-graders will follow that process through late March or early April and release their salmon into Black Creek, located behind Mexico High School. They eagerly asked and answered questions about eggs and salmon, and told Gramlich they were committed to increasing the local salmon population.


Keagan Shortslef, left, and Callen Cowden, right, show off their new
Volney Elementary second-grade class project: salmon egg raising.